Dancing with the Black Elephant

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Sponsored by the MS in ERM Program at Yeshiva University's Katz School-
www.yu.edu/katz/programs/graduate/ms-risk
Dancing with the Black Elephant (DWBE) is a podcast series focused on the topic of enterprise risk management and related topics. The goal of the podcast is to feature the latest thinking in ERM and current practices as they apply to real world examples. DWBE will feature speakers from around the risk management practice area, including connected fields of business continuity and disaster recovery, crisis and emergency management, and mitigation.

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Dancing with the Black Elephant navigateright Episode

E9 - Riding The Wave Daniel Aldrich Northeastern

I spoke with Dr. Daniel P. Aldrich who is a professor and director of the Security and Resilience Program at Northeastern University. He researches post-disaster recovery, countering violent extremism, the siting of controversial facilities and the interaction between civil society and the state. He has published five books, more than fifty peer reviewed articles, and written op-eds for The New York Times, CNN, Asahi Shinbun, along with appearing on popular media outlets such as CNBC, MSNBC, NPR, and HuffPost. His research has been funded by the Fulbright Foundation, the Abe Foundation, and the National Science Foundation, and he has carried out more than five years of fieldwork in Japan, India, Africa, and the Gulf Coast. Please see the following link for a longer bio: http://daldrich.weebly.com/bio--cv.html We spoke about how social capital can bring people together both here in the USA and overseas to demonstrate greater resilience in the face of COVID-19 and how communities can establish stronger social ties while maintaining physical distance and stay-at-home measures. We also discussed the use of the term physical distancing vs. social distancing. Dr. Aldrich’s website: http://daldrich.weebly.com/ The Black Wave: https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/B/bo40026774.html Social capital's role in humanitarian crises https://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/19042